Uniforms

In class, we discussed how people dress can show many things about them. Honestly, I have always attended a school that had some form of uniform. I would be so jealous of other kids because I could form an idea about their personality. For example, if I saw someone with a tie, I would think that they were more mature and professional. Sweatpants meant that you were athletic, or you were lazy. Skirts signals a girly-girl or someone who believes in a glamorous lifestyle. In high school, my school did require a uniform, but I was able to bend the rules.

My Wednesdays and Thursdays aren’t like everyone else’s. I wear my Marine Corps Junior Reserve Officer Training Corps uniform. This chance to stand out makes me appreciate the two days I don’t have to wear my school uniform. I never thought I would love the fatigues the way that I do now. However, I love the uniform today. Putting on the uniform makes me feel like I have something more to look forward to at school. However, the fatigues do require a lot of preparation.

Before I leave the house, I always look at myself in the mirror, and think about the long process it takes me to be “squared away.” I set the standard, since it’s my job: cadets look at me to guide them through the uniform. Being in-charge of the fatigues allows me to admire the process more. Because my hair can’t reach the bottom edge of my collar, I put my hair in a bun or make sure that my hair is short enough to meet the regulation. Now, I have to roll and flatten out my sleeves. My blouse has to be facing button side down on the table. Then, I fold half of my sleeve and start rolling until right above my elbow. Making sure that my sleeves fit tight but not too tight around my arm, so I won’t pass out during the day, isn’t an easy process.

The next morning, after I shower, I finally get to see my hard work come together. First, my skivvy shirt and socks, and then I put on my trousers and belt. The flap of my belt can’t be over four inches long and it has to meet the edge of the seam of the crotch of trousers. After that, I start to blouse my boots: fancy way of saying that my trousers billow out the top of my boots. Next, I put on my blouse. Finally, my rank has to be on edge of my collar and centered.

If I saw myself walking down the street with this uniform on, I would think that it takes a lot of preparation and pride to wear it. I stood out in way that not many people could. I think that’s why clothes are so important. Clothing shows a person individuality.

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