Television Diversity

As the last blog stated how diversity is a factor in this world in many ways. First blog I related it to track and field, but for this blog I would like to relate it to what is aired on TV.

Typical night you get home from work, you make some diner and then want to relax. Most of that time that includes watching TV. But what all exactly do you see? Depending on the type of cable or dish a person has, there could be a ton of options.

In the past, over 90% of television shows only include white actors, no color actors. As we watch TV today there are more shows that include colored people but still not equal towards white people.  What does this say about our society? That there is diversity. Actors and actresses today are given an opportunity to show their talents and without having to worry about receiving a part in a show based on their culture.

Also, the television networks have different channels based on the different types of people so they can reach the enjoyment to all. Some examples of these are the Hispanic channel, BET, and Freedom are just a few examples. But one surprising factor is that we do not see an Asian American channel so hopefully that change will be made in the future.

Another factor that is included in televisions is stereotypes. Stereotypes are all around in the world but most ones are learned from commercials or shows that are broadcasted on the television. Some examples of these are that black people love fried chicken, this can be portrayed in chicken restaurant commercials or just in a television show. The next stereotype is that Mexicans are always packed together, this is mostly shown in the shows rather than commercials. The last example is that white people are rich and snotty. If you think about any show you have seen, there is always that rich white girl that has her daddy’s money and gets her way with everything.

As you can see, diversity is a factor in television and can affect the society. These are just a few examples of how it affects the television.

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Regeneration Who

 

change

Being new to Doctor Who, I had no idea what to expect. The first few episodes I thought to myself that there was no way I was ever going to get into this show. However, the more that I watch of it, the more fascinating it becomes.

I can’t help but be amazed/confused/skeptical of this whole regeneration process. When we were first talking about the process in class, I was very confused. I wondered how they could change characters and blend it into what they had already created during the episodes. But after watching it now, let me tell you, they definitely pulled it off.

Just when I was getting used to the Ninth Doctor, it was almost as the creators knew and would not let it continue any further. This is when we saw the Doctor save Rose with a kiss, transferring the harmful cells from her body to his, causing him to regenerate. Then, we get a first glimpse at the Tenth Doctor.

The Tenth Doctor took a bit to get used to. I found myself hating him at first, only wanting to see Doctor Nine back. However, when I see the Tenth Doctor interact with Rose the same, have the same characteristics as the other, and know lots of information from his past, is when I start to become okay with it. I believe that this is why the doctors do not have names, and only go by the generic name, Doctor. It is a way to have different branches of the same person, but in the end, he is one person.

Regeneration is also a great way to keep the audience amused. By constantly changing the Doctor, everyone will always be on the edge of their seat wondering when the next Doctor will make his appearance. I cannot wait for future episodes and Doctor Eleven.

fantastic

Diversity and the Doctor

As we delve further into season two of Doctor Who, we are becoming more familiar with the tenth doctor played by David Tennant. This doctor follows the same trend of being a white male with a female companion, Rose.

Just as we debated the idea of having a female doctor in class, there are discussions in the internet world as well. According to debate.org, 34 percent of people say there should be a female doctor, while 66 percent say no.

For those who say yes, their main argument behind their reasoning consists of the humor of the formerly male doctor realizing he has changed into a woman. Others argue that we live in a society where we are constantly bombarded by sexist and heavy male advertising, TV and radio. Therefore, by having a female doctor, the TV series would be encouraging women to attain positions of leadership and power.

On the other side of the spectrum, those who said no argued that the issue of a female doctor has nothing to do with male superiority, but rather preserving who the doctor actually is as a character. Having a male doctor does not contribute to sexism considering that he does not carry any weapons, have a warship, and is not completely ruthless. Therefore, his character is not portrayed as a manly super hero, but rather a compassionate man who shares the spotlight with his companions, male or female.

Personally, I agree with both sides. Having a female doctor would be interesting and could potentially change the entire feel of the show, but I also think it’s important to preserve the show and characters as they are. Too many changes, major or subtle, in any show can be a huge risk which most directors aren’t willing to take. I believe that having a male doctor and female companion creates an effective balance between the action, romance, and drama within the series. While it is possible to maintain this balance with switched roles, a female doctor and male companion, most viewers are already comfortable with the characters in their current roles, as the pair work together as a dynamic duo rather than the doctor being the only hero.

Diversity within Wartburg

In an ever changing world Wartburg makes strides to incorporate as many students into the school as possible; no matter the location, race, religion, etc. According to http://www.wartburg.edu/diversity/, we have students from 28 states and 56 countries. This is surprising to me personally because there are twice as many countries represented at Wartburg than states. Although, this could be because students within the United States are exposed to a variety of colleges in their surrounding areas. Thus, choosing other schools rather than Wartburg. Whereas the international students do not have the ability to do this as easily.

Within the website, it also says that students of color make up 19% of the student body. While the website does not give a clear definition to races that fall into the term “of color”, I am still surprised at how low this number is. I am surprised by this statistic because by viewing and being on campus for almost two years now, I feel as if this number would have been higher.

Along with these statistics, Wartburg College represents 25+ Christian denominations. Additionally, the college represents eight world religions. This is relatively diverse for a Lutheran college. In today’s society, I have a hard time believing that a majority of students decide on a college strictly in regards to the college’s main denomination. Wartburg also works with students of other religions when it comes to required religion courses. While most students take RE 101, which focuses on the bible in a general sense. They also offer a world religions course which accommodates for those students. I took RE 101 this past fall semester and found the course very interesting. From a religion aspect Wartburg does well in including world religions.

While Wartburg has a small student population, we have a surprising representation of the world population. Religiously, racially, and geographically Wartburg makes strides to be diverse in all of these categories. I am lucky to have the opportunity to be exposed to such a diverse student body.

Diversity within Wartburg

In an ever changing world Wartburg makes strides to incorporate as many students into the school as possible; no matter the location, race, religion, etc. According to http://www.wartburg.edu/diversity/, we have students from 28 states and 56 countries. This is surprising to me personally because there are twice as many countries represented at Wartburg than states. Although, this could be because students within the United States are exposed to a variety of colleges in their surrounding areas. Thus, choosing other schools rather than Wartburg. Whereas the international students do not have the ability to do this as easily.

Within the website, it also says that students of color make up 19% of the student body. While the website does not give a clear definition to races that fall into the term “of color”, I am still surprised at how low this number is. I am surprised by this statistic because by viewing and being on campus for almost two years now, I feel as if this number would have been higher.

Along with these statistics, Wartburg College represents 25+ Christian denominations. Additionally, the college represents eight world religions. This is relatively diverse for a Lutheran college. In today’s society, I have a hard time believing that a majority of students decide on a college strictly in regards to the college’s main denomination. Wartburg also works with students of other religions when it comes to required religion courses. While most students take RE 101, which focuses on the bible in a general sense. They also offer a world religions course which accommodates for those students. I took RE 101 this past fall semester and found the course very interesting. From a religion aspect Wartburg does well in including world religions.

While Wartburg has a small student population, we have a surprising representation of the world population. Religiously, racially, and geographically Wartburg makes strides to be diverse in all of these categories. I am lucky to have the opportunity to be exposed to such a diverse student body.

Diversity in Science

The scientific community has expanded exponentially in the last century. While white males dominated the fields of science and engineering in the early 20th century, women and minorities have made significant advancements in terms of inclusion of both fields, with pioneers such as Marie Curie and George Washington Carver commanding their respective fields.

However, according to Fred Guterl in his article “Diversity in Science: Where Are the Data?” while men make up roughly one third of the U.S. population, they account for over half of the representation in science and engineering. In South Africa, where white men make up only 5% of the population, they represent 31% of all those in the fields of research and development. Throughout the article, Guterl further exemplifies the disparity of minorities, women, those with lower socioeconomic backgrounds, and those with disabilities in scientific fields

I find this especially concerning, considering the overarching themes and values of which science and technology embody. To me, science is about discovering what has yet to be discovered and broadening the scope of the world in which we find ourselves. Technology is about improving our existing developments and incorporating new ideas into these improvements. How can we as a society grow and improve if we allow only the ideas of a small sector to govern how we go about growing and improving? How can we really reach our full potential if only the thoughts of a single segment are heard and acted upon? What depth of information and advancement are we missing out on, simply because we refuse the means of which this information originates?

It is because of this fact that I find it all the more imperative for our global society to incorporate the ideas of many into the scientific discussion. The only way we can overcome is through understanding; the only way we can progress is through acceptance.

Diversity in Political Ideas

It goes without saying that many individuals were disheartened and angry when Donald Trump was chosen to be the incumbent president in November, myself included. As a woman and a scientist, the prospect that all the progress we as a society had made in recent decades could disappear in the blink of an eye was entirely frightening. The instance of such an event happened just hours after newfound President Trump gave his inaugural address: all occurrences of the words “climate change” were wiped away from government run websites. As I soon found out, this action made many others like me around the country incredibly upset, causing them to call out not only the Trump administration, but those who voted him into office.

However, while I found Trump’s act of deleting climate change entirely upsetting, my thoughts of anger were directed solely at Trump and his advisers, never those who voted for him.

The actions taken by those who were upset by Trump to reprimand and verbally abuse those who voted for him were, in my opinion, stooping to Trump’s level. Name calling will not change the minds of others. Maltreatment will not change the results of an election. And quite frankly, how can any individual become upset by the practices of another when they themselves turn and commit the same discrepancy, albeit in a slightly different form?

In a world where any thought that doesn’t match up with your own is considered reason for dismissal, the idea of attracting more flies with honey than with vinegar is one that we all seem to have forgotten. In my opinion, the best way to overcome the tension in our society today is through accepting diversity in all forms, part of which comes through diversity of ideas and backgrounds. While acceptance does not equate to agreement, it allows us to disagree respectfully, which is a skill we could all do better to exhibit.