Who run the world? Girls.

There has been so many doctors throughout history of Doctor Who, but the 13th Doctor is the first to be a woman. There has been a wide range of opinions on the first woman regeneration. Plenty of them have been negative but so many have been great as well. While you can argue whether you think it is a good idea or an awful idea, it is very difficult for someone to say that they do not think having a woman for the thirteenth doctor is a big deal.

The show had gone 54 years before casting a female as the Doctor. To stay relevant, the show would have had to take this step eventually, in my opinion. The show becomes a little more relatable because now they have opened the door to even stronger female characters than they had in the past. There are lots of females who like Doctor Who anyway, but now those females, especially little girls, have a more relatable role model. Personally, whenever I see someone on television or in movies that represents me in some way, I automatically become at least ten times happier.

The decision was made by the show’s new episode writer, Chris Chibnall. Steven Moffat had decided his time writing for the show had ended, but with that being said, that did not stop him from voicing his opinion about the new female doctor. Moffat has talked about why he has not casted a woman as the Doctor before, and honestly, it made some people angry. Moffat had said “This isn’t a show exclusively for progressive liberals; this is also for the people who voted for Brexit. That’s not me politically at all — but we have to keep everyone on board.” While the show does try to aim to lots of different types of people, I do not believe that this was quite the right thing to say. I think most conservatives would be able to say that they love their children  no matter what sex or gender they are. That is their child after all. Wouldn’t they want to see their child be inspired by a strong person as well? Doctor Who does not have anything to do with politics. It is a science fiction show meant to entertain. Although Moffat did admit that having a female doctor would go well with the audience, I still don’t think his political reasoning behind having only male doctors for so long is very justified.

Advertisements

The Thirteenth Doctor

Who is the new Doctor? Jodie Whittaker plays the Thirteenth Doctor and she is the first female Doctor of the series. I think that having a female Doctor is extremely groundbreaking. Since the beginning of Doctor Who, all of the Doctors have been male, but the idea of a female Doctor had been explored. However, it didn’t come into being until the Thirteenth Doctor of the 2005 Doctor Who reboot.

Jodie_Whittaker.jpg

To have a female Doctor is very exciting because there is now an opportunity for children to have a new hero. Times are changing and the world is becoming less of a male dominated place. Women are being put in job positions that were previously seen as impossible for women and they are fighting for equality in all aspects. One example that I can think of is the new Wonder Woman movie that came out. I remember working at my church’s Vacation Bible School and hearing all of the younger children talking about how cool Wonder Woman was and how they wanted to be like her or that she was their new favorite hero. I would think that a young girl would be extremely excited to watch a tv show where the main character was a female instead of a male. Even though women are gaining more opportunities in today’s society, there aren’t as many shows with a female lead as there are with male leads.

There have been mixed feelings about Jodie as the new Doctor. Some, such as David Tennant and some of the previous Doctors, have shown great support and happiness at the news of Jodie being the new Doctor. Others, do not support the idea of a female Doctor and have lashed out at Doctor Who. These people are so upset at the idea of a female Doctor that they say that they will stop watching it because the producers have ruined the show and they should cancel it. Looking at some of the comments from the people who are against a female Doctor is very frustrating because they seem petty and rude. They don’t want to even try to see how Jodie portrays the Thirteenth Doctor before they decide that they don’t want to watch it. These reactions seem similar to every time there is a new regeneration, because everyone has their own favorite Doctor and become upset when someone replaces them. For me, I am very excited for the Thirteenth Doctor and to see Jodie’s portrayal of the Doctor.

rbezLEd.jpg.png

Diversity in Doctor Who

Since Doctor Who rebooted in 2005 it has made strides in representing diversity on television.  Strides that can’t be said for many other television shows.  We open with episode one, “Rose” set in England, 2005, on a rare scene for television.  Rose is a working class woman who really is working class, not a dramatized version of this.  She lives in a small apartment with her single mother and wakes early every day to clock-in at her job in a department store.  She’s casual, dressing in clothes that certainly aren’t the height of fashion for the time, she isn’t dolled up in makeup only a professional could do, and what’s more; she isn’t the tiny waisted, long-legged pretty girl we’re used to seeing on TV.  Rose sets the pace for the growing diversity we’re about to be treated to in “Doctor Who”.

Not long after we get Captain Jack Harkness, the first openly pansexual in the history of “Doctor Who” who equally and openly shows attraction to men, women, aliens, and the non-gender conforming.  This was a huge leap for sexual and romantic diversity in “Doctor Who”, and one of the very first times queer people could see themselves in a character on television that wasn’t harmful.  

Next comes Martha, the first black companion on “Doctor Who”.  She’s intelligent and able to keep up with the Doctor’s rambling better, perhaps, than most other companions.  For people of colour, Martha is a big deal.  She’s a strong, woman of colour, in a leading role on one of the most popular television shows of all time.  With Martha, the television series continues to push forward for more diversity in their cast.

The next three companions, Donna, Amy, and Clara continue to portray strong female leads with diverse histories and personalities.  Along the way we meet a couple more sexually diverse characters, and characters from all different walks of life.  

Now we come to the most recent companion, Bill, who is both a woman of colour and openly gay.  She is one of the very first leading characters like this on television, a huge influence for women, people of colour, and members of the LGBTQIA+ community.  We finally have a leading character that many minorities can view themselves in in a positive way.

Soon we’ll be treated with something that came unexpected: a female Doctor.  Jodie Whittaker will soon take on the role of the Doctor and make history as the first female Doctor.  Many people are very excited about this.  We get a leading female, and also confirmation that Gallifreyans, or at least the Doctor, experience gender fluidity, which could be a nod toward the transgender community.

But when it comes to diversity, is it enough?  Though Doctor Who has done a great job positively representing different groups of people, we still are left itching for more.  Several groups who wish to see any kind of representation on television have been left out.  Doctor Who has come a long way, but I believe it can, and should, go much farther.  I hope that as the episodes continue to air we will continue to see a rise in representation in the cast.