The companions I’ve experienced in “New Who”

When i first started watching Doctor Who was in this class.  So my first companion that i was exposed to was Rose.  Within the first couple episodes I realized that I liked her personality and what she brought to the conversations and show as a whole.  I also was very thrilled when Mickey came on adventures as I enjoy his sarcasm and how he butts heads with the Doctor.   As I progressed through the series with the ninth Doctor I started noticing how awfully Rose treats Mickey and then started disliking her more and more.  Whenever she comes around he is like a little puppy and it’s so obvious that he loves her and would do anything for her.  She doesn’t seem to care because she’s so overwhelmed with the Doctor and always leaves him hanging.

The next companion that i was exposed to was Donna.  I HATE Donna.  She is so annoying, loud, and rude.  She is the epitome of childish, she has only been in one episode and yet she complained to the doctor, yelled and begged that guy to marry her and nagged throughout the episode.  I did not enjoy that episode at all and just wanted it to end.

Finally, Martha entered the picture.  The heroine of the series of female companions in my opinion.  She is humble and nice and loves the Doctor.  The first episode that I saw her in was the Shakespeare episode.  When she entered the conversation she always raised an important question or helped continue the episode as well as added an extra layer of diversity and often brought it up in episodes.  Clearly I am biased because she is easily my favorite.

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Pitting Women Against Each Other Part Two

In my previous post I discussed the issues with female representation in the episode School Reunion and I will now address the issues with S2E4 The Girl in the Fire Place.

In this episode the Doctor, Rose and Mickey find themselves on a broken down spaceship with windows that lead into France in the 1700s. What they later find out is that the ship’s crew is using human body parts to repair their ship and that the windows are all moments in Madam de Pompadour’s life since they need her brain as the final piece.

The first couple times the Doctor fleetingly meets Madam de Pompadour, otherwise known as Renette, she is a child. When he meets her a third time though she is a woman and she almost immediately kisses him and he is thrilled yelling out,

DOCTOR: I’m the Doctor, and I just snogged Madame de Pompadour. Ha, ha!

Image result for renette and the doctor kiss gif

Renette is set up as a love interest for the Doctor from the get go and since Rose had already been well established as a love interest, this forces the audience to pit these two women against each other.

Later on in the episode the Doctor and Renette have a short conversation where he goes into her mind in order to find out why the crew wants her. He becomes enamored with her and when she invites him to a party he accepts, seeming to forget about Rose and Mickey who are in grave danger. When Rose ask him why he would leave them in harm’s way his simple explanation is that he “invented the banana daiquiri a few centuries early.”

The Doctor and Renette only get closer as the episode goes on and by the end he considers bringing her onto the TARDIS and making her his next companion. When he goes to the future to pick her up though he misses her by a few minutes making that impossible.

The issue with this episode is that it diminishes a strong woman in history by making her a love interest through lazy writing and cheap tricks. The Doctor is almost a thousand years old so meeting Renette would have been a tiny speck of his life to him. On top of that, he had only met her twice as a child for a few minutes before they are suddenly making out and running off to parties together. It’s a love story that makes no sense. Why create a love triangle that the writers never intended to follow through with?

It’s unfortunate that the writers of Doctor Who make almost every woman that meets the Doctor fall in love with him. An incomplete list of these women would be Rose, Sarah Jane, Renette, Martha, and Amy. Why can’t a woman want to travel with the Doctor simply because she loves adventure and wants to explore time and space?

Rose, Mickey, and a bit of relationship advice

Rose and Mickey have an interesting relationship that causes quite a bit of stress for the both of them. Both have deep affection for one another but they are each searching for something more. They are tied to each other by their circumstances and past, but sometimes they realize that they are becoming very different people.

Rose wants adventure, excitement, and spontaneity. She wants to wake up each day and have a new experience every day. She is a wandering soul that will never be satisfied with a quiet life of the same thing day to day. If there is danger, she will be there in a heartbeat.

Mickey wants safety, comfort, and stability. He would love to repeat the same routine for the rest of his life and never think twice about it. Mickey needs to feel protected by having the security of a significant other to empathize with his life struggles. When Rose leaves him to go on adventures with the Doctor, Mickey feels abandoned and hopeless. After some time of being gone, Rose returns to find that Mickey has started seeing someone else. This is a turning point in their relationship because they both grasp that if things are not going to change, the two will be at the end of their relationship. They both have to decide which life they want to live and what they are willing to sacrifice. Rose decides to bring Mickey along on her adventures, which isn’t sacrificing much, but Mickey goes a ways out of his comfort zone again for Rose to help the Doctor, Rose, and Jack defeat the Slitheen. This shows Rose how much Mickey cares for her, but in the end it may not be enough to hold them together.

In my opinion, this is how a lot of relationships end. In life, we only look at our side of things, but someone else could be going through so much more than what shows on the outside. It is important to keep an open mind. The moment we are not willing to compromise on issues in the relationship is the moment the battle is already lost. One person can only do so much to keep the two together, and sometimes we have to look at how it is affecting us personally. Mickey will always come running to Rose because he is so in love with her, he would do anything for her. I feel like this relationship is doing more harm than good for him, and he will be a happier person if he just lets Rose go. The hardest part is realizing that sometimes we are not the best thing for the one’s we love.

The Doctor and I (also my favorite episode)

Before I start everything, can we just take a moment and laugh about how I stared at my laptop for about 20 minutes without putting a single word down? For a show that I love so much, I hardly know where to start.

Doctor Who has accompanied through most of my college years. I started watching the show about three years ago, on a cold winter night (Christmas break). I must admit, between the rough British accent and the old TV production, it was a little difficult for me to completely understand the show. But I still remember the exact moment when I fell in love :

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Mickey: “Pi-pi-pi-PIZZA! ”

Without having to view the show with a critical mind, I simply enjoyed the drama, the thrill, the freedom of traveling through time and space. One of my favorite episodes is set in 1890, France. The 11th doctor (played by Matt Smith) and his companion Amy Pond visits Vincent van Gogh during the last few months of life before committing suicide at age of thirty-seven. Through out the episode, aside from the running alongside the doctor and chasing monsters, this episode touched based many times on the mental condition of van Gogh. Van Gogh had a mental melt down and even admitted to the Doctor upon their departure, that he “might not do so well on his own”. After hearing this, the Doctor decided to bring van Gogh to Musee d’Orsay museum in Paris to show van Gogh the impact of his work. At the museum, van Gogh was shaken as the collection’s curator described van Gogh in a way where “He transformed the pain of his tormented life into ecstatic beauty… (van Gogh) is not only the world’s greatest artist, but also one of the greatest men who ever lived.” (Vincent and the Doctor, Doctor Who season 5, episode 10)

 

This episode was able to portrait the tormented artists within the limitation of essentially being a children’s program. Van Gogh’s mental anguish was displayed wonderfully by the actor Tony Curran. In my opinion, this episode is also a great representation of the essence of Doctor Who. There’s a little bit of history, a little bit of sic-fi. There’s enough emotions involved to bring people to tears and also a lot of moral stories that makes the viewers think more critically. The fact that the writer didn’t skirt around the metal illness impressed me very much.

In the end, meeting Vincent van Gogh and William Shakespeare, seeing a dinosaur in a spaceship and the end of time, these are merely a glimpse of what’s waiting in front of you, my dear classmates. Enjoy the class and the show!

A Children’s Show Adults Can Enjoy

The first time I watched Doctor Who was five years ago and I remember having a difficult time connecting with the show for the first couple of seasons. I was baffled by how it had such a great reputation when it was ultimately a children’s show that definitely seemed to be immature to me. As I continued to watch the show though I began to appreciate it, but that was ultimately because the later seasons are slightly more catered to an older audience.

Now that I am re-watching it and have just finished the first season, I can say that I thoroughly enjoyed this season. While I didn’t find this season to be any less immature than I did the first time, I was able to appreciate it by finding the underlying adult themes within each episode.

Two episodes that I had an especially difficult time connecting to my first time watching it was the two part The Aliens of London and World War Three. These episodes feature the alien Slitheen family who use a gas exchange in order to fit their relatively large bodies into a human’s smaller frame as a disguise. This gas exchange causes the Slitheens to fart more so than usual, which is obviously meant to be a bit of humor geared toward children. When you look past this childish humor though you can appreciate the deeper aspects of this episode. Those include Rose’s family and friends having been worried that she was either kidnapped or dead since she had been missing for a year, Mickey having been questioned by the police for possibly kidnapping his girlfriend, the police and her mother’s suspicion that The Doctor had taken advantage of Rose, and the metaphor for a corrupt government that was and still is relevant.

Doctor Who is a show that often times is childish but also tackles complicated and sometimes incredibly mature issues. I believe that a lot of people could enjoy this show if they are analytical while watching it and appreciate the deeper meaning behind all of the episodes.

The Mistreatment of Mickey

I think a big part of the Doctor’s personality is that he always tries to do the right thing. They try to portray the Doctor as a person of good character. So why does he treat Mickey so badly? The Doctor commonly refers to Mickey as an idiot or pretends to forget his name and calls him Ricky.

In my opinion, Mickey does nothing to deserve this treatment. He is very kind to Rose, even though she never sticks up for him and leaves him behind over and over again. Mickey has also helped Rose and the Doctor many times. He always uses whatever he can, like his knowledge of computers and his vehicle, to help them out, but they never seem to appreciate him.

Some people might think that the Doctor is jealous of Mickey’s relationship with Rose. I find that really hard to believe because Rose clearly likes the Doctor better than Mickey, so the Doctor has no reason to be jealous. It makes me dislike the Doctor when he treats Mickey like this. The Doctor acts like it is one big joke, but it clearly hurts Mickey’s feelings. In the episode “School Reunion,” Mickey realizes that they treat him like K-9 when they make him wait by the car.

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(https://ladygeekgirl.files.wordpress.com/2015/04/mickey-tin-dog-gif.gif)

Based on the look on his face, I don’t think Mickey thinks it is funny. Why does the Doctor not value Mickey? Is the Doctor just a bully? I’m not sure what the answer is, but I do know that I am disappointed in the Doctor when he treats Mickey like this. I expect more from him.

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(http://www.quickmeme.com/img/c6/c612b5e3b3655463e8cd2543a3c561601cfbe6ea672e354d988e0a90b8d59695.jpg)