Diversifying Diversity

Diversifying Diversity

Diversity- “the condition of having or being composed of differing elements: variety; especially: the inclusion of different types of people (such as people of different races or cultures) in a group or organization programs intended to promote diversity in schools” (Webster Dictionary). Some might ask why I added a definition of a very common used word in this day and age. When people think about diversity I feel like they look at diversity in a very one dimensional way. As the definition states it is different elements. An example that they give is race and culture. Some may argue that those are the only aspects of diversity. I feel that diversity can come in many forms such as peoples various socioeconomic statuses, sexuality, and even political views. These are all aspects of diversity overlooked. From an educator’s standpoint when people look at diversity within a school they look at mostly race. I can argue that I grew up in a diverse community while only a very small group of the community is not Caucasian. Some diversity comes in the different religious backgrounds and other a very diverse in ideas. I came from a school where ideas were shared, ideas were discussed, and people had opinions. That added to the diversity. We might have been a very Caucasian school but we were still diverse.

 

America is known as the melting pot. The melting pot of culture, race, and ideas. These all ideas make the United States a diverse place to live. Some these cultures have assimilated into a culture of their own. Iowa has created a culture different that of Texas. Although there are both a variety of races in every state the culture is different on different factors. The ideals from different areas are different. Your ideas are affected by multiple factors that are built from your community, family, and friends. These help build the identity and culture of the place you are a part of. Not to keep referring to school but Wartburg is very diverse. Not only in race but in the culture and ideas brought by students from other states, schools, communities, and countries. This makes up a culture at Wartburg. Already being in class I have had ideas changed by learning about fellow classmates culture. That this school/ community has made me more diverse. All in all, diversity is more than race but is a connection and changing the thing that grows and changes individuals constantly.

 

Sources

https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/diversity

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Diversity at Wartburg

When you think of Wartburg, would you say it’s a diverse college? Personally, I think diversity is one of the things that Wartburg strives for. As a college that’s located in the small town of Waverly, Iowa, it can be difficult to develop and attract a diverse student community. The college experience, in general, should be one that’s filled with diverse experiences that make a better, more well-rounded student. Wartburg’s 2016 to 2017 enrollment was 1,482 students. Of those 1,482 students, 48% are men and 52% are women. Those 1,482 students come from 28 states in the United States and 58 countries including the United States. Of Wartburg’s 1,482 students, 193 are students of color from the United States, and 131 are international students.  These 324 students make up the diverse student population at Wartburg. In total, the student body belongs to more than 25 Christian denominations and eight world religions. There are approximately 450 students involved in music on campus, making up 30% of the student body. There about 600 students who are involved in athletics. As you can see, Wartburg is a diverse community that helps its students become more well-rounded people and ready for the real world.

Diversity at RICE Day

April 11, 2017, was Wartburg’s sixth annual RICE Day celebration. RICE stands for Research, Internship, and Creative Endeavor Day.  It recognizes student achievement in and out of the classroom, and showcases Wartburg’s academic and co-curricular diversity across the disciplines. This day allows all students to see the diverse possibilities and opportunities at Wartburg College. I saw a lot of different academic presentations at RICE Day, but what fascinated me the most was the amount of diverse subjects being researched in the social sciences. I will highlight two of them in this post.

The first poster I’m going to talk about was titled “House Ventilation in Kenya” and was created by Emma Fuhs and Clay Henning. This group designed a stove that will reduce exposure to emissions and improve the overall health of the user and produce economic opportunities for Kenyan entrepreneurs. They believe that if this design was implemented, it would help save 4.3 million people’s lives annually from lung cancer because it would give proper ventilation. The design they came up with will reduce exposure to CO2 emissions by 90%. They estimate the cost to be around $50 and last for 15 years and could really help communities in Kenya.

The second poster I visited was titled “Capsaicinoid Concentration in the Carolina Reaper” and was created by Lily Zheng and Tessa Helmle. This group looked into the development of capsaicinoid in the Carolina Reaper, which is currently the hottest pepper in the world. The group researched the development of capsaicinoid, the chemical which makes peppers hot. They wanted to know the point in the pepper’s development when the pepper is at its hottest. They found that capsaicinoid develops in the pepper during weeks 1-4, and at week 4 it is at its highest. After 5 weeks, capsaicinoid starts to taper off.

As you can see, RICE Day showcases Wartburg’s academic and co-curricular diversity across the disciplines. Wartburg College is an amazing place where you can truly follow whatever passion you have.

Diversity within Wartburg

In an ever changing world Wartburg makes strides to incorporate as many students into the school as possible; no matter the location, race, religion, etc. According to http://www.wartburg.edu/diversity/, we have students from 28 states and 56 countries. This is surprising to me personally because there are twice as many countries represented at Wartburg than states. Although, this could be because students within the United States are exposed to a variety of colleges in their surrounding areas. Thus, choosing other schools rather than Wartburg. Whereas the international students do not have the ability to do this as easily.

Within the website, it also says that students of color make up 19% of the student body. While the website does not give a clear definition to races that fall into the term “of color”, I am still surprised at how low this number is. I am surprised by this statistic because by viewing and being on campus for almost two years now, I feel as if this number would have been higher.

Along with these statistics, Wartburg College represents 25+ Christian denominations. Additionally, the college represents eight world religions. This is relatively diverse for a Lutheran college. In today’s society, I have a hard time believing that a majority of students decide on a college strictly in regards to the college’s main denomination. Wartburg also works with students of other religions when it comes to required religion courses. While most students take RE 101, which focuses on the bible in a general sense. They also offer a world religions course which accommodates for those students. I took RE 101 this past fall semester and found the course very interesting. From a religion aspect Wartburg does well in including world religions.

While Wartburg has a small student population, we have a surprising representation of the world population. Religiously, racially, and geographically Wartburg makes strides to be diverse in all of these categories. I am lucky to have the opportunity to be exposed to such a diverse student body.

Diversity within Wartburg

In an ever changing world Wartburg makes strides to incorporate as many students into the school as possible; no matter the location, race, religion, etc. According to http://www.wartburg.edu/diversity/, we have students from 28 states and 56 countries. This is surprising to me personally because there are twice as many countries represented at Wartburg than states. Although, this could be because students within the United States are exposed to a variety of colleges in their surrounding areas. Thus, choosing other schools rather than Wartburg. Whereas the international students do not have the ability to do this as easily.

Within the website, it also says that students of color make up 19% of the student body. While the website does not give a clear definition to races that fall into the term “of color”, I am still surprised at how low this number is. I am surprised by this statistic because by viewing and being on campus for almost two years now, I feel as if this number would have been higher.

Along with these statistics, Wartburg College represents 25+ Christian denominations. Additionally, the college represents eight world religions. This is relatively diverse for a Lutheran college. In today’s society, I have a hard time believing that a majority of students decide on a college strictly in regards to the college’s main denomination. Wartburg also works with students of other religions when it comes to required religion courses. While most students take RE 101, which focuses on the bible in a general sense. They also offer a world religions course which accommodates for those students. I took RE 101 this past fall semester and found the course very interesting. From a religion aspect Wartburg does well in including world religions.

While Wartburg has a small student population, we have a surprising representation of the world population. Religiously, racially, and geographically Wartburg makes strides to be diverse in all of these categories. I am lucky to have the opportunity to be exposed to such a diverse student body.